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Dr Kevin Fong - MSc MRCP FRCA

Dr Kevin Fong is a doctor of medicine (currently with Air Ambulance) with a special interest in human space exploration and extreme environment physiology. He holds degrees in medicine, astrophysics and engineering, and is an honorary senior lecturer in physiology at University College London. He has also completed specialist training in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine, has worked with NASA’s Human Adaptation and Countermeasures Office at Johnson Space Centre in Houston and the Medical Operations Group at Kennedy Space Centre in Cape Canaveral. Kevin currently works as a consultant anaesthetist at University College London Hospital, and is the founder and associate director of the Centre for Altitude, Space and Extreme environment medicine.

Kevin has written and presented several television documentaries including Horizon: ‘Monitor Me’, ‘How to Avoid Mistakes in Surgery’, ‘Back from the Dead’, ‘How to Mend a Broken Heart’, the 50th Anniversary Special for The Longitude Prize and a Horizon Guide on Senses, and the ‘Space Shuttle: The Final Mission’ and ‘To Boldly Go’, a two part series about extreme physiology for BBC2. He also presented ‘Extreme A&E’, a four part medical series for Channel 4 and was part of the expedition for the critically acclaimed three-part series ‘Operation Goldrush’ (BBC2)

For radio, Kevin has presented numerous fascinating programmes including ‘The Truth about Success and Failure in Medicine’ (BBC World Service), ‘Human Hibernation: The Big Sleep’, ‘Why Become a Doctor’, ‘Trauma Medicine’, Sacrifice – the Story of SARS’, ‘Scott’s Legacy’ ‘Hurricane Rash’, ‘Frontiers – Viruses’ and ‘Cycling in Cities’ (BBC Radio 4). He wrote and delivered a lecture entitled ‘Why we should not retreat from the final frontier’ for the Freethinking Event in 2011, a science documentary about SET1 and the Drake Equation (BBC World Service), and he is a regular presenter of Health Check and guest on award winning ‘The Infinite Monkey Cage’, ‘A Good Read’ and ‘Increadible Women’ (BBC Radio4).

     

Photography by Anthony Cullen
(c) Copyright 2011


Kevin is a highly engaging, motivational and inspirational speaker, giving captivating talks around the world about his incredible career in extreme medicine, innovation and engineering. In December 2015 Kevin presented the prestigious Ri Christmas Lectures titled ‘How to Survive in Space’, He is also a regular contributor to the Times Higher Education magazine and the Guardian. His first book entitled ‘Extremes’ (Hodder & Stoughton 2013) recently won The American Association for the Advancement of Science Awards (AAAS).

As a junior doctor in 1999, Kevin organised the Futures in UK Space Biomedical Research conference, in partnership with the British National Space Centre; senior delegates from NASA, the European Space Agency and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute were in attendance. This event was the first of its kind in the UK and led to the establishment of a new undergraduate course in extreme environmental physiology and a strategy for furthering the UK’s involvement in programmes of human space flight.

In 1999, as a junior doctor, Kevin organised the Futures in UK Space Biomedical Research conference, in partnership with the British National Space Centre; senior delegates from NASA, the European Space Agency and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute were in attendance. This event was the first of its kind in the UK and led to the establishment of a new undergraduate course in extreme environmental physiology and a strategy for furthering the UK’s involvement in programmes of human space flight. In the decade that followed, Kevin worked and trained at NASA’s Johnson Space Centre in Houston, Texas and at Kennedy Space Centre in Cape Canaveral. Kevin founded CASE, the Centre for Altitude, Space and Extreme environment medicine, at UCL in 2001. This small group comprised clinicians and scientists with a special interest in space, high altitude, aviation and dive medicine, as well as environmental extremes. In 2003, Kevin was awarded a prestigious NESTA fellowship. This grant allowed him to further pursue his interest in extreme environments. He was later involved in the planning of the Cauldwell Xtreme Everest expedition, served as a dive medical officer for Coral Cay Conservation and returned to NASA to participate in a project investigating artificial gravity.

Follow Kevin on Twitter @Kevin_Fong

Kevin is represented by Sue Rider Management

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